Looking Back: On May 7…

In 1940, a debate began in the British House of Commons, and it culminated several days later in the replacement of Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain with Winston Churchill. In 1945, General Alfred Jodl signed unconditional surrender terms at Reims, France, ending Germany’s participation in World War II. The document took effect the next day. In 1946, Tokyo Telecommunications Engineering, which was later renamed Sony, was founded […]

Looking Back: On May 6…

In 1536, the army of Inca Emperor Manco Inca Yupanqui began a 10-month siege of Cuzco against a garrison of Spanish conquistadors and Indian auxiliaries led by Hernando Pizarro. In 1882, Irish Under-Secretary Thomas Henry Burke and Irish Chief Secretary Lord Frederick Cavendish were stabbed to death by members of the radical group Irish National Invincibles as they walked through Phoenix Park in Dublin. In 1954, English athlete Roger Bannister became the first person […]

Looking Back: On May 5…

In 1973, Secretariat won the 1973 Kentucky Derby in a record time of 1:59.24. An American thoroughbred racehorse, Secretariat was the first U.S. Triple Crown winner in 25 years. He set race records in all three events in the series — the Kentucky Derby, the Preakness Stakes (1:53), and the Belmont Stakes (2:24). He is considered to be one of the greatest thoroughbreds of all […]

Looking Back: On May 2…

In 1955, Tennessee Williams won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. In 1964, an explosion sank the USS Card while it was docked at Saigon. Viet Cong forces were  suspected of placing a bomb on the ship, which was raised and returned to service less than seven months later. In 1969, the British ocean liner Queen Elizabeth 2 departed on her […]

Looking Back: On April 30…

In 1973, President Richard Nixon announced that the Watergate scandal forced the resignation of several officials, including White House aides H. R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichman. In 1975, Communist forces gained control of Saigon, leading to the unconditional surrender of South Vietnamese President Duong Van Minh and the formal end of the Vietnam War. In 1993, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) announced that World Wide […]

Looking Back: On April 29…

In 1587 during the Anglo-Spanish War, Francis Drake led the first of several naval raids on the Spanish Armada that destroyed so many ships in the Bay of Cadiz that Philip II of Spain had to delay his plans to invade England for more than a year. In 1862 during the American Civil War, Union forces under David Farragut captured New Orleans, securing access into […]

Looking Back: April 24…

In 1704, the first regular newspaper in British Colonial America, “The Boston News-Letter,” was published in Massachusetts. In 1800, the U.S. Library of Congress was established when President John Adams signed legislation to appropriate $5,000 to purchase “such books as may be necessary for the use of Congress.” In 1885, sharpshooter Annie Oakley was hired by Nate Salsbury to be a part of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West. In 1907, Hershey […]

Looking Back: On April 23…

In 1014, Irish forces led by Brian Boru clashed with the Vikings in the Battle of Clontarf. In 1661, Charles II, King of England, Ireland, and Scotland, was crowned at Westminster Abbey. In 1954, batting against Vic Raschi of the St. Louis Cardinals, Hank Aaron of the Milwaukee Braves hit the first of his record-setting 755 home runs in Major League Baseball. In 1968, students protesting the Vietnam War at Columbia University in New York City took over administration […]

Looking Back: On April 22…

In 1945, Adolf Hitler admitted defeat during World War II after he learned that Soviet forces took Eberswalde without a fight. While in his underground bunker, he reportedly stated that suicide was his only recourse. In 1954, witnesses began testifying at the Red Scare’s Army-McCarthy Hearings, which were aired live on television. In 1964, the New York World’s Fair opened for its first […]

Looking Back: On April 21…

In 753 BC, Romulus and Remus founded Rome, according to the calculations by Roman scholar Varro Reatinus. In 1836, Texan forces led by Sam Houston defeated Gen. Antonio López de Santa Anna and his Mexican troops in the Battle of San Jacinto near La Porte, the decisive battle in the Texas Revolution. In 1914, the United States detained a German steamer carrying materiel for the Mexican federal government during the […]